Virginia Traffic Law: What’s a Fog Line? . . . or Don’t Drive on a Fog Line

In U.S. v. Williams, Criminal No. 3:13MJ137 (2013), a criminal defendant was charged with possession of marijuana, among a bunch of other crimes.  He moved the court to suppress all evidence of his crimes on the ground that the arresting officer lacked reasonable suspicion to stop the defendant’s vehicle in the first instance.  The arresting officer claimed that he did have reasonable suspicion to believe that the defendant had committed a crime: his car touched one of the fog lines on at least five occasions.  As such, the court was faced with some interest questions: (i) um, what is a fog line?, (ii) does simply touching a fog line constitute a crime?, and (iii) does simply touching a fog line at least give an officer reasonable suspicion that a crime was committed?  Richmond U.S. District Magistrate Judge David J. Novak fortunately had answers to these questions. Continue reading

Virginia DUI Law: The Private Parking Lot Loophole in Action

In Villareal v. Commonwealth, No. 0764-13-2 (2013), an off-duty police officer was hired to perform security outside of a restaurant that was part of an outdoor strip mall.  He unfortunately got to witness firsthand an intoxicated woman back her car right into his parked car in the mall’s parking lot.  He promptly arrested her and she was thereafter charged with driving under the influence (4th offense) and driving on a license suspended due to multiple prior convictions for driving under the influence.

The criminal defendant moved the trial court to dismiss her charge of driving on a suspended license under Va. Code § 46.2-391 on the ground that she was not seen driving on a “highway.”  The trial court overruled her motion and convicted her of driving on a suspended license.  She accordingly appealed. Continue reading